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Andy Warhol
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A Set of Six Self-Portraits, 1967
Andy Warhol
34x26 Fine Art Print
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Guns, c. 1981-82
Andy Warhol
40x30 Fine Art Print
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Campbell's Soup I (Tomato...
Andy Warhol
24x40 Fine ...
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Mao, 1972
Andy Warhol
26x30 Fine ...
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Siberian Tiger
Andy Warhol
24x32 Fine ...
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Stamped Shoe With Butterflies
Andy Warhol
7x5 Note Card
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Andy Warhol Endangered Sp...

3x4 Magnet
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Kimiko Powers, 1981
Andy Warhol
25x35 Fine ...
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Goethe - Black and Yellow
Andy Warhol
38x38 Fine Art Print
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Shoes, 1980-Lg
Andy Warhol
38x50 Fine ...
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300 SL Coupe, 1954
Andy Warhol
28x36 Fine ...
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Mercedes Type 400, 1925
Andy Warhol
28x36 Fine ...
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Mercedes Type 400, 1925
Andy Warhol
36x28 Fine Art Print
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Andy Warhol - Banana
Andy Warhol
36x24 Wall Poster
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Four Monkeys (sm)
Andy Warhol
26x33 Fine ...
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Diamond Dust Shoes, 1980 ...
Andy Warhol
26x34 Fine ...
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Ads: Life Savers, 1985 (b...
Andy Warhol
30x32 Fine ...
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Brooklyn Bridge, 1983
Andy Warhol
28x30 Fine ...
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Elvis - 1963
Andy Warhol
42x50 Fine ...
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Pine Barrens Tree Frog
Andy Warhol
24x32 Fine ...
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Statue of Liberty, 1963
Andy Warhol
11x14 Fine ...
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Elvis, 1963 (triple Elvis)
Andy Warhol
26x36 Fine ...
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Querelle Grey
Andy Warhol
28x39 Fine ...
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Beethoven - Pink book
Andy Warhol
23x23 Fine Art Print
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25 Cats Named Sam and One...
Andy Warhol
11x14 Fine ...
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Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia:
Andy Warhol (August 6, 1928 – February 22, 1987) was an American painter, filmmaker, publisher, actor, and a major figure in the Pop Art movement.

Warhol was born as Andrew Warhola in Forest City, Pennsylvania. His parents, Ondrej (Andrew) Warhola (original surname was Varchola, he changed it after coming to US) and Júlia Zavacká, were working class immigrants of Ruthenian ethnicity from Miková, in northeast Slovakia; his father worked in the coal mines of Pennsylvania. The family was Catholic. In the third grade, he came down with a strange disease called St. Vitus' dance, which is a virus of the nerves and thought to be a complication of scarlet fever. This disease changed his looks, and his life, forever.

Warhol showed early artistic talent and studied commercial art at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh. In 1949, he moved to New York City and began a successful career in magazine illustration and advertising. He became well-known mainly for his whimsical ink drawings of shoes done in a loose, blotted style.

In the 1960s, Warhol began to make paintings of famous American products such as Campbell's soup cans and Coca-Cola. He switched to silkscreen prints, seeking not only to make art of mass produced items, but to mass produce the art itself. He said that he wanted to be like a robot. He hired and supervised "art workers" engaged in making prints, shoes, films, books and other items at his studio, The Factory, located on Union Square in New York City. Warhol's body of work furthermore includes commissioned portraits and commercials.

A lot of Warhol's works revolve around the concept of Americana and American culture. He painted money, dollar signs, food, groceries, women's shoes, celebrities, and newspaper clippings. To him, these subjects represented American cultural values. For instance, Coca-Cola represented democratic equality because, quote:

"What’s great about this country is that America started the tradition where the richest consumers buy essentially the same things as the poorest. You can be watching TV and see Coca-Cola, and you know that the President drinks Coke, Liz Taylor drinks Coke, and just think, you can drink Coke, too. A Coke is a Coke and no amount of money can get you a better Coke than the one the bum on the corner is drinking. All the Cokes are the same and all the Cokes are good. Liz Taylor knows it, the President knows it, the bum knows it, and you know it."
He used popular imagery and methods to visualize the American cultural identity of the 20th century. This popular redefinition of American culture is a theme and result of Warhol's art. Because American culture has had great international influence, Warhol did, as well.

Outside of the art world, Andy Warhol is best known for the quote, "In the future everyone will be world-famous for 15 minutes." He later told reporters, humorously, "My new line is, 'In fifteen minutes, everybody will be famous.'"

Socialite and Recluse
Warhol used to socialize at Serendipity and Studio 54, nightclubs in New York City. He was generally regarded as quiet, shy, and as a meticulous observer. More than one person jokingly referred to him as "death warmed over."

Warhol was openly gay, rare for celebrities of his stature at the time. Many people think of Warhol as asexual and as merely a voyeur, but these notions have been debunked by biographers like Fred Guiles, scholars like Richard Meyer, personal accounts of relationships by ex-lovers such as Jed Johnson and Billy Name, and by the overtly campy and homoerotic nature of his work itself. Throughout his career, Warhol produced erotic photography and drawings of male nudes. Many of his most famous works (portraits of Liza Minelli, Judy Garland, Elizabeth Taylor, and films like "My Hustler", "Blow Job", and "Lonesome Cowboys") draw from gay underground culture and/or openly explore the complexity of sexuality and desire. In fact, many of his films premiered in gay porn theaters. The first works that he submitted to a gallery in the pursuit of a career as an artist were, in fact, homoerotic drawings of male nudes. They were rejected for being too openly gay.

A meticulous collector, he organized almost every piece of paper, fan mail—after taking off the stamps—and magazine related to his fame along with personal notes, gay pornography and found artifacts into hundreds of numbered boxes and set them aside, never to open them again. Warhol referred to these boxes as his "time capsule". Many exist today and are available for research at his Pittsburgh museum. Warhol's house was filled to the brim with his collected art, artifacts, and Americana.

Many of his later commissioned portraits were a direct or indirect result of this networking. As a famous artist, Warhol and his Factory attracted and facilitated many "groupies" and friends that Warhol would include in films and happenings. Warhol promoted these factory regulars to fame, creating the Warhol superstars. They would appear in and help him make his work, play in his movies, write his books, hang out and generally become his following.

When Warhol was asked to give a series of university lectures that he didn't feel like doing, one of his friends put on a wig and white make-up, and pretended to be him by sitting quietly on the stage. Other Superstars explained Warhol's work to the audience, and urged them to drop out of college. The University eventually found out Warhol's "fraud" and the following dispute had to be settled with a refund.

Warhol would regularly volunteer at the homeless shelters in New York, particularly during the busier times of the year. He described himself as a religious person, although not fully accepted by religion because of his homosexuality. Many of his later works contain almost hidden religious themes or subjects, and a body of religious-themed works was found posthumously in his estate.

Shooting
On June 3, 1968, Valerie Solanas, a Factory regular, entered Warhol's studio and fired three shots at Warhol, nearly killing him. Although the first two rounds missed, the third passed through Warhol's left lung, spleen, stomach, liver, esophagus, and right lung. Solanas then turned the gun on a companion of Warhol, Mario Amaya, injuring his thigh. Warhol survived his injuries, but he never fully recovered. Earlier, Solanas had given a script to Warhol, in hopes that he would make a film out of it. Warhol never did. Apparently, she had visited the Factory earlier in the day to ask that they give the script back to her. It had, however, been lost. She later explained that she had attacked Warhol because, "he had too much control over [her] life." The story of Valerie Solanas was made into the 1996 film I Shot Andy Warhol, starring Lili Taylor and directed by Mary Harron.

In the hospital, his doctors had already declared him deceased, after which he was resuscitated. Warhol later joked that he was now invulnerable, since he had gone through death and came out alive. The shooting and Warhol's "death" received wide media coverage.

One of Warhol's associates, Paul Morrissey, later satirized the event in his movie "Women In Revolt", calling a group similar to Solanas' S.C.U.M. (Society for Cutting Up Men), P.I.G. (Politically Involved Girls).

In 1990 Lou Reed recorded the album Songs for Drella (one of Warhol's nicknames was Drella, a combination of Dracula and Cinderella) with fellow Velvet Underground alumnus John Cale.

Warhol had adopted Reed's band the Velvet Underground as one of his projects in the 1960s, "producing" their first album The Velvet Underground and Nico as well as providing the album art, widely regarded as some of the greatest album art of all time. The album itself is also regarded as one of the greatest (and most influential) albums in rock history. After the band became successful Warhol and band leader Reed started to disagree more and more about the direction the band should take, and the contact between them faded. On Drella, Reed apologizes and comes to terms with his part in their conflict.

Death
Warhol died in New York City following routine gallbladder surgery at the age of 58. Warhol was afraid of hospitals and doctors, so he had delayed having his recurring gall bladder problems checked.

He is interred at St. John the Baptist Catholic Cemetery in Bethel Park, south of Pittsburgh. Fellow artist Yoko Ono was among the speakers at his funeral.

Andy Warhol had so many posessions it took Sotheby's 9 days to auction his estate after his death for a total gross amount of over 20,000,000 (USD).



Sincerely yours,
 
Asbjorn Lonvig, artist
43 Fejringhusvej
8722 Hedensted, Denmark
Tel. +45 7589 0477
 

 
 
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Shop in the shop in my E-shop: Print on demand posters, fine art prints etc. - art works by Andy Warhol - POD
Shop in the shop in my E-shop: Print on demand posters, fine art prints etc. - art works by Andy Warhol - POD
Shop in the shop in my E-shop: Print on demand posters, fine art prints etc. - art works by Andy Warhol - POD
Shop in the shop in my E-shop: Print on demand posters, fine art prints etc. - art works by Andy Warhol - POD
Shop in the shop in my E-shop: Print on demand posters, fine art prints etc. - art works by Andy Warhol - POD
Shop in the shop in my E-shop: Print on demand posters, fine art prints etc. - art works by Andy Warhol - POD
Shop in the shop in my E-shop: Print on demand posters, fine art prints etc. - art works by Andy Warhol - POD
Shop in the shop in my E-shop: Print on demand posters, fine art prints etc. - art works by Andy Warhol - POD